April 8, 2020 Technology makes the world a new place

How a Centralized Incident Response Plan Can Impact on Your Security System

As a business owner or manager, your staff is the key to your success. Getting them engaged with their work and the technology that makes it all possible is a must. There are many approaches you can take to enhancing employee engagement with technology.

The first approach you can take to encourage employee engagement is to offer virtual work. It’s been shown that employees who are given the chance to work virtually tend to be happier and have less sick days than those who always work out of an office location. Offering your employees the chance to work virtually can benefit their mental health while still allowing them to connect with other employees through virtual collaborations. Some examples of these include project management tools, shared whiteboards, file sharing, and wikis.

It’s no joke that humans have a natural desire to compete with one another. This desire is something that every good business owner or manager should use to enhance employee engagement with new technology. Gamification is a broad term that is used to describe turning technology-related work tasks into a competition for your employees. This has been shown to boost employee motivation and morale. This strategy works great when you’re trying to introduce new technology into your workplace. Instead of employees thinking of learning the new technology as a chore, they can see it as a fun game.

Lack of recognition is something that can take a toll on all employees from time to time. It’s not about major bonuses, although their nice, it’s just about the gesture. Many employees are happy with a good job or a thumbs up on their work. While it’s not always possible for a manager or owner to focus on employee recognition 24/7, it doesn’t hurt to encourage recognition from co-workers. With online platforms, …

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Do You Know Where Business Strategy and IT Infrastructure Meet Up ?

The sheer scale, size, and scope of corporate IT infrastructure are things that have substantially grown in the last fifteen years. For many businesses, IT infrastructure went from several dozen servers in a basement to elaborate data centres featuring many thousands of servers such as VMware hosting. In the early years of the 1990s, networked storage was barely in existence. However, modern IT organisations sink tens of millions of dollars into them.

This expansion has solid reasons behind it. Infrastructure is what runs the many applications that process a company’s transactions, handle client data and information that provide market insights, and serve as a foundation to the analytical tools which let managers and executives make their choices in how to operate complicated organisations. In truth, infrastructure is a driving force behind a lot of rises in productivity and corporate growth seen in recent years.

However, the actual ubiquity of such networking, storage, and computing technologies means that a number of corporate executives actually look at IT infrastructure like it’s a commodity. That’s not a wise choice. It is admittedly true that individual components like storage and servers are things that have been commoditised. The same could even be argued for some support processes, such as application monitoring. However, a truly effective infrastructure operation is going to create its own value by making smart decisions regarding which particular technologies see use and how they all get integrated. If you buy a technology product from a vendor, then it might technically be a commodity. On the other hand, it’s not a commodity when you have the power to pull support, software, and hardware together in combinations of robust features, vibrant resiliency, and efficient cost.

Value Sources

Copious evidence exists that creativity in corporate infrastructure has paved the way for many businesses …

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